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Celebrating Illustration, Design, Cartoon and Comic Art of the Mid-20th Century

Here's another...

Tuesday, November 15, 2005


piece by Jones for Woman's Day - also from the early sixties. I'm not sure why Jones used a painterly approach for his Saturday Evening Post assignments but this more linear style for Woman's Day... perhaps it was a preference of the different art directors? Whatever the case, I love it!

This technique, where elements are dropped out instead of rendered, first brought to prominence by Al Parker and others in the early fifties, was still very much in style ten years later, and was still being taught to us at art school in the eighties. I notice it being used with great success by some of the hippest young illustrators even today and often wonder if they are operating intuitively or if they are aware of the style's legacy. Its a powerful reminder of the importance of negative space!

5 comments

  1. Thanks Leif, every morning we look foreward to see what else you have for us! Great inspiration and a morning ritual!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Leif, every morning we look foreward to see what else you have for us! Great inspiration and a morning ritual!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks Leif, every morning we look foreward to see what else you have for us! Great inspiration and a morning ritual!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Leif:
    Although he became best known for his humorous animal renderings, I think Bob Jones had all the boy-girl 'glamour' chops he needed to create slick romantic work that was at least as good as anything being done by his contemporaries, including the best the Cooper Studio had to offer. But I guess he felt he had to differentiate himself somehow from the rest of the pack. Personally, I don't think the other glamour illustrators of the day could've done the animal personalities that Jones turned out.

    Neil Shapiro

    ReplyDelete
  5. a strong combintaion of strong iollustration and graphic design. it's this sort of stuff that you really don't see anymore that really excites me about classic illustration from that era!

    ReplyDelete

 

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